One should be on red alert for an engineered price

first_imgOne should be on red alert for an engineered price declineIt was a zero day in gold on Friday, as the metal traded within a five dollar price range for the entire session, with a tiny rally into the close of electronic trading.  Gold closed on its ‘high’ of the day, such as it was.The low and  high ticks aren’t worth the effort of looking up.Gold closed on Friday at $1,339.00 spot, up $3.70 from Thursday.  Net volume was almost invisible at 67,000 contracts.The same can be said for silver, as it traded in about a 10 cent range all day long.  The highs and lows weren’t worth looking up, either.Silver closed yesterday at $21.445 spot, up 3 cents from Thursday.  Volume, net of July and August, was a pretty beefy 32,000 contracts, which is almost half of gold’s net volume.  Something under 20,000 contracts would have been closer to normal.As I’ve mentioned a few time over the last few months, silver’s net volume is now substantially larger that it ever used to be—and I’m wondering why that’s the case, especially relative to gold.Platinum traded flat as well, but palladium had a down/up rally that started at 10 a.m. in Zurich—bottomed shortly after the Comex open—and was back to a few bucks above unchanged shortly after 12 o’clock noon in New York.  Platinum closed unchanged—and palladium closed up two bucks.  Here are the charts. The overbought conditions in both metals has grown more extreme in the last couple of days.I’d like to point out one more time that the Commercial net short in silver is at, or very close to, it’s extreme all-time high of the last five years—and one should be on red alert for an engineered price decline at some point in the not-to-distant future.  My great concern, as I mentioned in the discussion regarding the COT Report, is that with silver is currently sitting at $21.45 spot—and only up about $2.75 from its $18.75 low of the first week of June—one has to wonder how low will JPMorgan et al be able to drive the price if they really put their shoulders into it as, once again, they ring the cash register on the technical funds for fun, profit and price management.I know it hasn’t happened yet—and it’s entirely possible that we could move higher from here for a while—but the COT numbers, using past as prologue, indicate otherwise.  All we can do is wait it out.That’s all I have for today.  Enjoy what’s left of your weekend—and I’ll see you here on Tuesday. The dollar index closed in New York late on Thursday afternoon at 80.12—and didn’t do much until 9 a.m. BST in London.  At that point it dipped down to 80.04 before being rescued up to the 80.23 level at 9 a.m. in New York.  It faded a small handful of basis points into the close, finishing he Friday session at 80.19—up 7 basis points from Thursday.I was happy to see the gold stocks bounce back, but they looked like they rallied strongly for the same reason that they got sold off on Thursday—and that was no reason that I could see.  The HUI closed up 2.35%.Ditto for the silver equities, as they gained back everything they lost on Thursday, plus a hair more—as Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 3.07%.Here’s the long-term Silver 7 Index to show how little ground we’ve actually gained during the current rally.The CME Daily Delivery Report drew a blank yesterday, as no gold or silver contracts were posted for delivery on Tuesday.There were no reported changes in GLD on Friday—and as of 6:01 p.m. EDT yesterday evening, there were no reported changes in SLV, either.There was no sales report from the U.S. Mint on Friday.There a little bit of movement in gold over at the Comex-approved depositories on Thursday, as 3,000 troy ounces were reported received—and 225.4 troy ounces were shipped out.However, it was a monster day in silver, as 336,763 troy ounces were reported received—and a whopping 1,942,290 troy ounces were shipped out the door.  The link to that activity is here.And now for yesterday’s Commitment of Traders Report.  I said in The Wrap in Friday’s column—“Eye-balling the above charts its a tough call on both metals, but basically unchanged wouldn’t surprise me.”I wasn’t even close.In silver, the Commercial net short position blew out by an astonishing 6,063 contracts, or 30.3 million ounces.  The Commercial net short position is now up to 290 million troy ounces, a position we haven’t been at since December 2012 when silver was $34 the ounce.  Now we’re back at an almost 5-year high in the Commercial net short position—and silver is only $21 the ounce.  One wonders how low JPMorgan et al will drive the price when they pull the pin on the technical funds this time around?Ted said that this reporting week’s action was, once again, the technical funds buying back short positions and going long—and in the face of that, the raptors sold another 2,800 long contracts, the Big 4 [read JPMorgan] increased their short position by 2,500 contracts—and the 5 through 8 largest traders added about 800 contracts to their short position.  Ted pegs JPMorgan’s short side corner in the Comex silver market at 17,500 Comex contracts, or 87.5 million troy ounces.Here’s a chart that Nick Laird sent my way yesterday evening.  It shows the long and short positions of all three groups of traders in the COT Report.   Looking only at the center chart, you can see the the Non-Commercial/technical funds in red—and the the Commercials in blue—and the thin black line is the positions of the Nonreportable contract holders that’s visible behind the red bars.Just looking at the Non-Commercial category, in five weeks they’ve gone from a net long position of about 1,000 contracts all the way to a new record high of 48,000 contracts—and for what, dear reader?  A lousy two dollar plus move in the price of silver on the chart directly above it.If you look at the top price chart, we had a similar two dollar move in February and March on much smaller trading action between the technical funds and the Commercials.  And if you go back to August 2012, the price of silver rallied to $34 from $27 by the first week of October—a seven dollar move.  This time—and in a much shorter time period, only five weeks—and on bigger buying volume by the technical funds, silver is only up two bucks and change.In his weekly review on Saturday, July 5, silver analyst Ted Butler had this to say about the above situation: “I have come to believe that the main cause behind the diminishing nature of progressive silver rallies is a willful intent on the part of the regulators and key commercials on the COMEX to snuff out any silver rally before it generates sufficient investment demand that could lead to a physical shortage. More than any alternative explanation that possibly comes to mind, I believe there is a conspiracy between the CFTC and other parts of the U.S. Government, along with crooked private interests on the COMEX, to not let silver go too far on the upside. Further, while this may also be true to some extent in gold, it is in silver where the situation is most critical.”By the way, Ted’s essay “The Silver Conspiracy” will be posted in the clear sometime next week—and you can rest assured that it will appear in this column the moment it shows up in the public domain.There was also deterioration in gold in the COT Report as well, as the Commercial net short position increased by 5,548 contracts, or 554,800 troy ounces.  The Commercial net short position now stands at 16.60 million troy ounces.  Once again it was the technical funds/Non-commercial traders that covered shorts and went long—and the Commercials of all stripes sold longs, or went short against them.  Ted said the JPMorgan sold another 1,000 contracts of its long-side corner in the Comex futures market—and is now down to 2.5 million troy ounces.You’d have to go back to March of 2013 to see the Commercials holding this big a net short position in gold.  It was from that point in March of last year where gold got clocked for $400 the ounce by the end of July.  One wonders what fate “da boyz” have in store for us in gold going forward?  One would have to presume that it would be similar to the fate that awaits silver.By the way, the small traders in the Nonreportable category never have any influence over the price.  It’s the interplay between the mechanically-driven technical funds and the Commercials that drives the price up and down as moving averages are broken in either direction.Here’s the equivalent chart for gold that I posted just above for silver.And, without doubt, that big out-of-the-blue rally in both gold and silver in London trading on their Thursday morning will have driven the Commercial net short positions in both these metals to new extremes, but we’ll have to wait until next Friday to find out just how bad it was.I have a decent number of stories for you today—and I hope you can find time in what’s left of your weekend to read the article that interest you the most.With silver prices so low—and at or below the primary cost of production, there has rarely been a more inopportune time for any producer to be hedging and locking in current prices. This is confirmed by the fact that silver (and gold) miner hedging is at multi-decade lows. Yet the concentrated silver short position of the eight largest traders (all commercials) on the COMEX is near its highest level in years, meaning that the concentrated short position is not legitimate since it doesn’t involve bona fide hedging.At the same time, the concentrated short position of the 8 largest COMEX shorts is near record highs, JPMorgan’s share has rarely been lower, according to the COTs. The only explanation that makes sense is that those involved in the conspiracy are trying to take the attention and heat off of the crooks at JPMorgan by shifting some of the short position from JPMorgan and placing it in other large short accounts. There is no legitimate reason why the 5 thru 8 largest traders on the COMEX hold an all-time record short position at a time of record low miner hedging. As distasteful as I’ve always found the word “conspiracy” to be, I can’t find a more apt description for what has transpired on the COMEX. – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 09 July 2014Today’s pop “blast from the past” dates from this American Rock Band‘s 1981 triple platinum album “Paradise Theatre”.  The group—and the tune—are instantly recognizable—and the link is here.Today’s classical blast from the past is courtesy of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.  For me, my two favourite instruments are the piano and violin—and the vast majority of the well-known concerto repertoire of the last two hundred years or so, was written for these two instruments.  If those two instruments, along with all their associated music vanished from the face of the earth overnight, my next favourite instrument is the oboe.  Mozart’s Oboe Concerto in C major, K314 is probably the most well known.It was originally composed in spring or summer of 1777 for oboist Giuseppe Ferlendis (1755–1802) from Bergamo, then reworked by the composer as a concerto for flute in D major in 1778. The concerto is a widely-studied piece for both instruments—and is one of the more important concerti for the oboe.There are no credits given in this youtube.com clip, but it’s quite good.  It’s the only complete performance I could find—and the link is here.There’s nothing to discuss regarding yesterday’s price action in either gold or silver.  The only thing that I continue to note is that the high trading volume in silver continues unabated, regardless of the price action.Here are the 6-month charts for both gold and silver updated with yesterday’s price and volume data.last_img read more

Commute by Bike Check Out Googles 350 Smart Jacket

first_img Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. March 14, 2017 Tom Brant Next Article –shares Google Add to Queue A $350 pair of Levi’s that syncs with your smartphone? Is it Fashion Week again? No, it’s South by Southwest, the annual gathering of tech enthusiasts and culture lovers, where Google and Levi’s offered an update on a project they’ve been working on to make a stylish denim garment full of technology.The garment isn’t jeans, though, it’s a special version of Levi’s Trucker jacket woven out of electronic threads that Google is working on as part of its Project Jacquard. First announced in 2015, the jacket is inching closer to reality with a price tag and a release date of “this fall,” according to Engadget.For $350, you’ll get a jacket that takes the term “wearable” — traditionally used for smartwatches — to new heights. A small tag will be embedded in the denim, containing all the electronic components the jacket needs to connect to your smartphone. The rest of the garment looks like any other Trucker jacket, except you can swipe it to take calls and use other smartphone functions when your device isn’t easily accessible.The target audience is urban bike riders: a promotional video shows a biker swiping his sleeve to change song tracks, get navigation directions and answer calls. The electronic fibers woven into the denim capture touch interactions, and use machine-learning algorithms to determine various gestures. Data is then wirelessly transmitted via the electronic tag — removable for washing — to a mobile device.This being Google, of course, Project Jacquard isn’t stopping at a denim jacket for fashion-conscious techies who commute to work by bike. The company envisions the fabric being used by any fashion designer, and it is working on developing an ecosystem of apps and cloud services to convince people that the high-tech fabric is worth a higher price.Speaking of paying a premium, you can pick up a “dumb” Trucker jacket right now for $65. We’re betting some people will find it worth spending an extra $285 to answer phone calls from their coat sleeve, but many more won’t. Image credit: via PC Magcenter_img 2 min read News reporter This story originally appeared on PCMag Commute by Bike? Check Out Google’s $350 Smart Jacket. The Google-Levi’s partnership takes the term ‘wearable’ to new heights (and price tags). Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Register Now »last_img read more

Amazon Spark Is a PinterestLike Shopping Social Network

first_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. July 21, 2017 The new feature inside Amazon’s iPhone app lets you follow specific categories and people, making it easy to buy things you find. Add to Queue Image credit: Amazon via PCMag Amazon Amazon Spark Is a Pinterest-Like Shopping Social Network Next Article Angela Moscaritolocenter_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals As if you don’t already buy enough stuff on Amazon, the ecommerce giant just added a new Pinterest-like feature to its iPhone app aimed at helping you “find more of what you like.”Dubbed Spark, the new shopping social network lets you follow specific categories and people. Of course, Amazon has made it super easy to buy things there, too.To access Spark, tap the hamburger icon (three parallel horizontal lines) in the Amazon iPhone app, select Programs and Features, then tap Spark. The first time you visit, you’ll select a few of your interests: things like books, style and fashion, food, technology, do it yourself (DIY), home décor, beauty, recipes, video games and women’s fashion, for instance.From there, Spark will create a “feed of personalized content from other Amazon customers with similar interests as you.” If you see something you like, just tap the product link or shopping bag icon to buy it.You can also create posts to share a specific product or story, and “interact with people by commenting or smiling on their posts.” We assume “smiling” on someone’s post is basically like adding a heart or thumbs up.Anyone in the U.S. with the Amazon iPhone app can look at posts on Spark, but you’ll need to be a paid Prime member to contribute your own.Just keep in mind that whatever you do on Spark is pretty much public. “Anyone can view your posts, comments, the interests you follow and see your Amazon Profile,” Amazon said in its Spark FAQs. Your profile displays customer reviews you’ve written but does not show your purchasing or browsing history. This story originally appeared on PCMag 2 min read –shares Reporter Register Now »last_img read more

Tinder Suspends CoFounder Over Sexual Harassment Claims

first_img Tinder Suspends Co-Founder Over Sexual Harassment Claims Add to Queue Former Staff Writer Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. –shares Next Article Tinder’s former vice president of marketing, Whitney Wolfe, is suing the company she says she co-founded on charges of sexual harassment and sex discrimination. According to court documents filed yesterday, Wolfe alleges that Tinder’s CMO, Justin Mateen, called her a whore at a company event in the presence of CEO Sean Rad.And after having played a pivotal role in the company’s founding, including coining its name, Wolfe says her status as a co-founder was revoked because Mateen believed having a young female in the role made “the company seem like a joke.”Tinder’s parent companies, IAC and Match.com, are named as co-defendants in the lawsuit.Related: Oh, Snap — Evan Spiegel ‘Mortified’ by Vulgar Frat EmailsCourt documents also reveal incinerating text messages between Mateen and Wolfe, who briefly dated. “You prefer to social climb middle aged Muslim pigs that stand for nothing,” Mateen wrote after they’d broken up.In response, Wolfe repeatedly asked Mateen to stop harassing her. “I am trying to do my job and this is very out of control,” she said.In lieu of the leaked texts, Mateen was immediately “suspended pending an ongoing internal investigation,” according to Tinder. “We unequivocally condemn these messages, but believe that Ms. Wolfe’s allegations with respect to Tinder and its management are unfounded,” the company said in a statement to USA Today.Additional allegations include that Rad repeatedly ignored Wolfe’s complaints about being harassed, and bullied her into resigning.Related: New Dating App Startup Aims to Be the ‘Thinking Person’s Tinder’She also alleges that he sent her a text message “depicting IAC chairman Barry Diller as a penis.”And after leaving the company, Wolfe says she tearfully recounted the abuses she suffered to Sam Yagan, CEO of Match.com, who was “unmoved” and “didn’t feel compelled to do anything in response.”Wolfe is asking for lost back pay, lost fringe benefits, lost equity and damages for emotional distress and pain suffering.”I had hoped this would be resolved confidentially, but after months of failed attempts, I have decided to pursue this suit,” she said in a statement to USA Today.Related: GitHub Co-Founder Quits Following Harassment Allegations 3 min read Legal Geoff Weiss Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals July 1, 2014 Register Now »last_img read more

Admetrics Launches Marketing AI Assistant Newton to Advise Marketers on Growth Opportunities

first_imgAdmetrics, a marketing intelligence company that supports advertisers with data science solutions to gain actionable insights into their marketing data, announced the release of Newton, a new capability that enables companies to run always-on experimentation for insight generation at scale.Newton represents a shift in marketing intelligence software, providing marketers a simple way to turn any marketing data into countless experiments running in parallel to learn, optimize and iterate at scale by continuously analyzing data and making recommendations for growth. In this capacity, Newton functions as a 24/7 expert and advisor, drawing from deep domain expertise to convert data into knowledge, proactively identifying insights and actions to drive positive business outcomes.The ability of Newton to evaluate options and alternatives, determine cause-and-effect relationships and predict highly probable and profitable outcomes positions marketers to bridge the growing disconnect between information and insights. Research firm Forrester puts the scope of the problem into perspective, observing that a massive 60 to 73% of data companies collect is not analyzed.The outcome is a vicious cycle in which marketers invest massive resources to gather tremendous amounts of data from an ever-increasing number of sources and channels—and yet lack the capabilities to turn that information into action, according to a 2019 survey of CMOs and brand marketers reported in Inc. magazine. This also dovetails with Admetrics internal data that shows the majority of brands (57%) have “access to sufficient data resources,” but, at the same time, critically lack capabilities to address and execute data-informed tasks including testing, reporting and bidding model optimization.Marketing Technology News: Blis Expands Into the Netherlands With First HireNewton was architected to address this issue, providing marketers the capabilities to automate and scale data analysis in order to maximize insight generation and increase cost efficiency. To achieve this, Newton leverages Quantify, the Admetrics experimentation engine released in March, to provide highly accurate statistical results at the highest possible pace. This enables quicker time to value and dramatically faster data-driven decision making than traditional testing methodologies by empowering marketers and campaign managers to continuously learn from ever-running experiments.Leading data-driven companies across categories have developed their own experimentation platforms in order to outpace their competition. It’s a competitive advantage that used to demand significant investment and data science expertise, but this is changing with the advance of next-generation solutions, according to Markus Repetschnig, CEO and co-founder at Admetrics.“The release of Newton, which was purpose-built to supercharge experimentation and data analytics by suggesting actions marketers can take to optimize growth, marks a turning point in what all companies can achieve—even if they lack big budgets and large data science teams,” Repetschnig explains.Marketing Technology News: Shoppers Take Center Stage in the 2019 Retail Systems Research Report on eCommerce Website Performance“Newton helps advertisers and agencies minimize missed opportunities for growth and stop losses as early as possible,” Repetschnig says. More importantly, Newton is also one of the first in a new breed of augmented analytics solutions, a cutting-edge category of data capabilities Gartner has identified as a top 10 strategic tech trend for 2019. In practice, Newton harnesses AI models that are tailored to specific advertising value and attribution chains to generate insight and provide actionable recommendations at scale, while minimizing the human component previously required to find issues and opportunities hidden deep in the data.Advertisers and agencies that want to leverage the new capability do not need to change their existing infrastructure as Newton works with any kind of marketing data and can be easily plugged into any tech stack. To date, Newton offers expert models for programmatic advertising and social platforms like Facebook, with additional models in the pipeline to address other marketing use cases.Marketing Technology News: Mongolia’s Mongolsat Networks Optimizes Multi-Screen Video Delivery with Verimatrix and moTV.eu AdmetricsMarketing AImarketing intelligenceMarketing TechnologyMarkus RepetschnigNews Previous ArticleCardinal Path’s 2019 State of Marketing Technology Report Highlights Consolidation & DisruptionNext ArticleTableau Welcomes More than 2,000 Customers and Partners to Berlin for Sold-Out European Conference Admetrics Launches Marketing AI Assistant Newton to Advise Marketers on Growth Opportunities MTS Staff WriterJune 19, 2019, 10:40 pmJune 19, 2019 last_img read more

Moderate alcohol consumption linked with lower risk of hospitalization

first_img Source:http://www.neuromed.it/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 12 2018While the heavy negative effects of high consumption are confirmed, those who drink in moderation resort less to the hospital than teetotalersA study of the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention of I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed (Pozzilli, Italy), in collaboration with the Department of Nutrition of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (Boston), highlights that people who consume alcohol moderately (one glass of wine a day), in the general framework of Mediterranean diet principles, have a lower risk of being hospitalized compared to heavier drinkers, but also to the teetotallers.The research, published in the scientific journal Addiction, involved 21,000 participants in the Moli-sani epidemiological study, followed for over 6 years. During this period, their drinking habits were related to their number of hospital admissions.Related StoriesRecreational marijuana users tend to drink more alcohol, medicinal users drink lessExcess grey matter in the brain can predict escalating drinking behavior in teensPeople use executive control processes to ignore cues that signal something rewarding”We observed – says Simona Costanzo, first author of the paper, who spent a period of research in this field at Harvard University, thanks to a grant from the Veronesi Foundation – that a heavy consumption of alcohol is associated with a higher probability of hospitalization, especially for cancer and alcohol-related diseases. This confirms the harmful effect of excessive alcohol drinking on the health. On the other hand, those who drink in moderation present a lower risk of hospitalization for all causes and for cardiovascular diseases compared to lifetime abstainers and former drinkers “.”The data on hospitalizations – comments Licia Iacoviello, Head of the Laboratory of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology of I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed and professor of Hygiene and Public Health at the University of Insubria in Varese – is very important in relation to the impact of alcohol on public health. Hospital admissions, in fact, represent not only a serious problem for people, but they have also a strong impact on National health systems. Our study confirms how much excess alcohol can weigh on healthcare facilities, underlining the urgent need of managing the problem, but it also confirms and extends our previous observations according to which moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduction in mortality risk, regardless of the type of disease”.”We are absolutely not saying – underlines Ken Mukamal Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School – that any teetotaler should start drinking to improve his/her health. However, this research reaffirms that the effects of alcohol consumption cannot be reduced to a single catchphrase or punchline. This very comprehensive study clearly shows that we need to consider its health effects based upon both dose and disease”.last_img read more

Alterations in brain networks contribute to cognitive dysfunction in psychiatric disorders

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 3 2019Psychiatric disorders share common alterations of functional connectivity between three core brain networks involved in cognition, according to a meta-analysis published in Biological Psychiatry. The network alterations were localized in brain regions underlying general cognitive performance. The study suggests that the alterations in these networks contribute to the cognitive dysfunction present in multiple psychiatric disorders.The alterations in functional connectivity, which emerged from a meta-analysis of 242 functional brain imaging studies in people with a variety of psychiatric disorders, were found in the three large-scale networks considered to be particularly important for complex cognition–the default mode network; frontoparietal network; and the salience network. Further, analysis of 363 structural brain imaging studies revealed reduced gray matter that was confined to the altered networks, tightly linking structural and functional alterations.Related StoriesIT Faces the Digital Pathology Data TsunamiResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionNANOLIVE‘s novel CX-A defines a new standard for live cell imaging in 96 well plates for continuous organelle monitoring in cell populationsImportantly, the study provides the first evidence from a meta-analysis of common functional connectivity alterations in neurocognitive networks across psychiatric disorders. “This new knowledge calls for studying brain-based diagnostic biomarkers of psychiatric disorders that are beyond traditional diagnostic boundaries,” said senior author Yong He, PhD, Beijing Normal University, China.Although psychiatric illnesses are considered to be distinct disorders, cognitive dysfunction appears in most of them. This overlap of symptoms across psychiatric disorders has been a major challenge to precisely categorize patients. Although enormous progress has been made in characterizing the neural correlates of diagnoses and symptoms over the past 25 years, neuroimaging biomarkers have yet to contribute to the psychiatric diagnostic process.”Dr. He and colleagues provide an important clue as to why neuroimaging diagnostic biomarkers have made limited progress,” said John Krystal, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry. “This finding pushes us to rethink the potential role of neuroimaging in the diagnostic process.”The shared neurocognitive network alterations suggest that neuroimaging may be providing a measure of symptom-related pathology not directly related to the disease process. This could pose a problem, as the study of psychiatric disorders–which are defined by collections of symptoms–is primarily limited to the study of behaviors. It is possible that disease-specific elements of biology exist, but the similarity between disorders in this study indicate that greater efforts may be needed to adjust for common elements of pathology in the search for “disease-specific” biomarkers. Source:http://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible says new policy report

This is according to Dr. Barbara Ribeiro of Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at The University of Manchester, in On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, a new policy report on the role of AI and Robotics in society, being published today.Dr. Ribeiro adds because investment into AI will essentially be paid for by tax-payers in the long-term, policymakers need to make sure that the benefits of such technologies are fairly distributed throughout society.She says: “Ensuring social justice in AI development is essential. AI technologies rely on big data and the use of algorithms, which influence decision-making in public life and on matters such as social welfare, public safety and urban planning.””In these ‘data-driven’ decision-making processes some social groups may be excluded, either because they lack access to devices necessary to participate or because the selected datasets do not consider the needs, preferences and interests of marginalised and disadvantaged people.”On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution is a comprehensive report written, developed and published by Policy@Manchester with leading experts and academics from across the University. Provided by University of Manchester Play Dr. Barbara Ribeiro, from Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at the University of Manchester, discusses how to carry out and implement such processes in ‘On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ by Policy@Manchester. Credit: Policy@Manchester The publication is designed to help employers, regulators and policymakers understand the potential effects of AI in areas such as industry, healthcare, research and international policy.However, the report doesn’t just focus on AI. It also looks at robotics, explaining the differences and similarities between the two separate areas of research and development (R&D) and the challenges policymakers face with each.Professor Anna Scaife, Co-Director of the University’s Policy@Manchester team, explains: “Although the challenges that companies and policymakers are facing with respect to AI and robotic systems are similar in many ways, these are two entirely separate technologies – something which is often misunderstood, not just by the general public, but policymakers and employers too. This is something that has to be addressed.” Professor Barry Lennox, Professor of Applied Control and Head of the UOM Robotics Group, adds: “The transfer of robotics technology into industry, and in particular the nuclear industry, requires cultural and societal changes as well as technological advances.”It is really important that regulators are aware of what robotic technology is and is not capable of doing today, as well as understanding what the technology might be capable of doing over the next 5 years.”The report also highlights the importance of big data and AI in healthcare, for example in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR).Lord Jim O”Neill, Honorary Professor of Economics at The University of Manchester and Chair of the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance explains: “An important example of this is the international effort to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The AMR Review gave 27 specific recommendations covering 10 broad areas, which became known as the “10 Commandments.” Play Dr. Barbara Ribeiro, from the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at the University of Manchester, discusses how organizations can develop more representative AI public policies in ‘On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ by Policy@Manchester. Credit: Policy@Manchester One particular area the report highlights where robotics can have a positive impact is in the world of hazardous working environments, such a nuclear decommissioning and clean-up. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Is the UK’s energy policy fit for purpose? PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen The development of new artificial intelligence (AI) technology is often subject to bias, and the resulting systems can be discriminatory, meaning more should be done by policymakers to ensure its development is democratic and socially responsible. Play Dr. Barbara Ribeiro, from the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at the University of Manchester, discusses how local governments can ensure AI development incorporates greater social justice in ‘On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ by Policy@Manchester. Credit: Policy@Manchester “All 10 are necessary, and none are sufficient on their own, but if there is one that I find myself increasingly believing is a permanent game-changer, it is state of the art diagnostics. We need a “Google for doctors’ to reduce the rate of over prescription.”The versatile nature of AI and robotics is leading many experts to predict that the technologies will have a significant impact on a wide variety of fields in the coming years. Policy@Manchester hopes that the On AI and Robotics report will contribute to helping policymakers, industry stakeholders and regulators better understand the range of issues they will face as the technologies play ever greater roles in our everyday lives. Citation: Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible says new policy report (2018, May 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-artificial-intelligence-socially-responsible-policy.html Explore further read more

Moment of truth tech firms in tennis linecall battle

first_imgA behind-the-scenes battle at the world’s top tennis tournaments pits an upstart newcomer and an established star. Citation: Moment of truth: tech firms in tennis line-call battle (2019, March 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-moment-truth-tech-firms-tennis.html © 2019 AFP Explore further Foxtenn in action at last yeart’s ATP Moselle Open in Metz, eastern Francecenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Hawk-Eye, the British firm that innovated ball-tracking technology, has been ruling the sector for more than a decade.Its famous video simulations of contested line calls at Grand Slam tournaments are known to tennis lovers around the world.They are produced by computer-linked tracking cameras that calculate a flight path and project the ball’s landing point.But start-up FoxTenn from Spain believes it can do better by eliminating doubt from the line-call business.Hawk-Eye, which operates a dozen or so cameras placed around the tennis court, officially acknowledges a three-millimetre or so margin of error in its simulations of where the tennis ball would bounce.For Foxtenn that tiny margin is too wide and it says it can offer real-time technology that eliminates any room for debate.”What we are offering is the technology of truth and transparency, with the actual impact of the ball on the court,” FoxTenn president Javier Simon told AFP.In fact, FoxTenn’s 40 or so cameras around the court, backed up by scanners and lasers, effectively capture the moment of impact of the ball, without need for any simulation. Lobbying hardSimon says the technology has been given a zero-error rating in a study approved by the main tennis federations, the ATP, ITF and the WTA.Simon says that so far around 30 men’s and women’s tennis tournaments have adopted the FoxTenn system, or about 20 percent of the professional circuit.”Our goal is to equip all the tournaments,” he said, particularly the top-tier Masters 1000 events and the four Grand Slams. Within a few months the line-call contracts will be coming to an end at the nine Masters events, and FoxTenn is lobbying hard for a chance to prove its worth.One tournament which already uses Foxtenn, Marseille Open, found that initial difficulties were overcome after two seasons.”At the start, I liked the idea of a challenger for Hawk-Eye, which had a bit of a monopoly,” said tournament director Jean-Francois Caujolle.”Foxtenn seemed lighter to install, a bit cheaper and had real-time images, which is good.”At the start it wasn’t fast enough, but they have made progress, and it’s very good. Maybe it will make Hawk-Eye renovate.”Players have other things to focus on and are rarely directly concerned by behind-the-scenes technology.Roger Federer said he has no idea whether he has been exposed to Foxtenn.”I doubt it. Yeah, I don’t even know about it,” he told AFP.”You know the tournaments I’ve played. I guess there they haven’t used it. Hasn’t it been Hawk-Eye all the way?”French world number 19 Gael Monfils says he is used to Hawk-Eye but thinks FoxTenn may hold a potential edge “because you see where the actual ball landed”. Algorithm predicts the next shot in tennislast_img read more

Too many airplane systems rely on too few sensors

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Had I trusted my airspeed sensor, I would have pushed the plane’s nose down in an attempt to regain speed, and possibly put too much strain on the aircraft’s frame, or gotten dangerously close to the ground. But even small aircraft are packed with sensors: While worried about my airspeed, I noticed that my plane was staying at the same altitude, the engine was generating the same amount of power, the wings were meeting the air at a constant angle and I was still moving over the ground at the same speed I had been before the airspeed allegedly dropped.So instead of overstressing and potentially crashing my plane, I was able to fix the problematic sensor and continue my flight without further incident. As a result, I started investigating how computers can use data from different aircraft sensors to help pilots understand whether there’s a real emergency happening, or something much less severe.Boeing’s response to its crashes has included designing a software update that will rely on two sensors instead of one. That may not be enough. The angle of attack describes how the wings meet the oncoming air. Credit: J Doug McLean/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA A test with real dataWe tested our computer program with real data from the 2009 crash of Air France Flight 447. The post-crash investigation revealed that three different pitot tubes froze up, delivering an erroneous airspeed reading and triggering a chain of events ending in the plane plunging into the Atlantic Ocean, killing 228 passengers and crew.The flight data showed that when the pitot tubes froze, they suddenly stopped registering airspeed as 480 knots, and instead reported the plane was going through the air at 180 knots – so slow the autopilot turned itself off and alerted the human pilots there was a problem.But the onboard GPS recorded that the plane was traveling across the ground at 490 knots. And computer models of weather indicated the wind was coming from the rear of the plane at about 10 knots.When we fed those data to our computer system, it detected that the pitot tubes had failed, and estimated the plane’s real airspeed within five seconds. It also detected when the pitot tubes thawed again, about 40 seconds after they froze, and was able to confirm that their readings were again reliable. When one sensor fails, other equipment can provide data to detect the failure and even estimate values for the failing sensor. A different sort of testWe also used our system to identify what happened to Tuninter Flight 1153, which ditched into the Mediterranean Sea in 2005 on its way from Italy to Tunisia, killing 16 of the 39 people aboard.After the accident, the investigation revealed that maintenance workers had mistakenly installed the wrong fuel quantity indicator on the plane, so it reported 2,700 kg of fuel was in the tanks, when the plane was really carrying only 550 kg. Human pilots didn’t notice the error, and the plane ran out of fuel.Fuel is heavy, though, and its weight affects the performance of an aircraft. A plane with too little fuel would have handled differently than one with the right amount. To calculate whether the plane was behaving as it should, with the right amount of fuel on board, we used the aerodynamic mathematical relationship between airspeed and lift. When a plane is in level flight, lift equals weight. Everything else being the same, a heavier plane should have been going slower than the Tuninter plane was. Our program models only cruise phases of flight, in which the plane is in steady, level flight – not accelerating or changing altitude. But it would have been sufficient to detect that the plane was too light and alert the pilots, who could have turned around or landed elsewhere to refuel. Adding information about other phases of flight could improve the system’s accuracy and responsiveness. Using information on ground speed and the current wind conditions, a computer can estimate the plane’s airspeed. Credit: Shigeru Imai and Carlos Varela, CC BY-ND Provided by The Conversation Ethiopian Airlines crash: What is the MCAS system on the Boeing 737 Max 8? A Cessna 182 in flight. Credit: Rob Hodgkins/Flickr, CC BY-SA Planes have many sensors, supplying all kinds of useful data. Credit: vaalaa/Shutterstock.com Citation: Too many airplane systems rely on too few sensors (2019, April 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-airplane-sensors.html Credit: The Conversation Cross-checking sensor dataAs a plane defies gravity, aerodynamic principles expressed as mathematical formulas govern its flight. Most of an aircraft’s sensors are intended to monitor elements of those formulas, to reassure pilots that everything is as it should be – or to alert them that something has gone wrong.My team developed a computer system that looks at information from many sensors, comparing their readings to each other and to the relevant mathematical formulas. This system can detect inconsistent data, indicate which sensors most likely failed and, in certain circumstances, use other data to estimate the correct values that these sensors should be delivering.For instance, my Cessna encountered problems when the primary airspeed sensor, called a “pitot tube,” froze in cold air. Other sensors on board gather related information: GPS receivers measure how quickly the aircraft is covering ground. Wind speed data is available from computer models that forecast weather prior to the flight. Onboard computers can calculate an estimated airspeed by combining GPS data with information on the wind speed and direction. Better stillAs my team continues to develop flight data analysis software, we’re also working on supplying it with better data. One potential source could be letting airplanes communicate directly with each other about weather and wind conditions in specific locations at particular altitudes. We are also working on methods to precisely describe safe operating conditions for flight software that relies on sensor data.Sensors do fail, but even when that happens, automated systems can be safer and more efficient than human pilots. As flight becomes more automated and increasingly reliant on sensors, it is imperative that flight systems cross-check data from different sensor types, to safeguard against otherwise potentially fatal sensor faults. Explore further The apparent connection between fatal airplane crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia centers around the failure of a single sensor. I know what that’s like: A few years ago, while I was flying a Cessna 182-RG from Albany, New York, to Fort Meade, Maryland, my airspeed indicator showed that I was flying at a speed so slow that my plane was at risk of no longer generating enough lift to stay in the air. What about the Boeing 737 Max 8 crashes?The full range of data about Lion Air 610 and Ethiopian Airlines 302 is not yet available to the public, but early reports suggest there was a problem with one of the angle-of-attack sensors. My research team developed a method to check that device’s accuracy based on the plane’s airspeed.We used aerodynamics and a flight simulator to measure how variations in the angle of attack – the steepness with which the wings meet the oncoming air – changed the horizontal and vertical speed of a Cessna 172. The data were consistent with the performance of an actual Cessna 172 in flight. Using our model and system, we can distinguish between an actual emergency – a dangerously high angle of attack – and a failing sensor providing erroneous data.The actual numbers for a Boeing 737 Max 8 would be different, of course, but the principle is still the same, using the mathematical relationship between angle of attack and airspeed to double-check each other, and to identify faulty sensors. If the computer’s estimated airspeed agrees with the sensor readings, most likely everything is fine. If they disagree, then something is wrong – but what? It turns out that these calculations disagree in different ways, depending on which one – or more – of the GPS, wind data or airspeed sensors is wrong. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.last_img read more

Dont Waste Your Emotions on Plants They Have No Feelings Grumpy Scientists

first_img What Distinguishes Humans from Other Animals? In animals, neurobiology refers to the biological mechanisms through which a nervous system regulates behavior, according to Harvard University’s Mind Brain Behavior Interfaculty Initiative. Over millions of years, brains in diverse animal species have evolved to produce behaviors that experts identify as intelligent: Among them are reasoning and problem-solving, tool use and self-recognition. Beginning in 2006, some scientists have argued that plants possess neuron-like cells that interact with hormones and neurotransmitters, forming “a plant nervous system, analogous to that in animals,” said lead study author Lincoln Taiz, a professor emeritus of molecular, cell and developmental biology at the University of California Santa Cruz. “They even claimed that plants have ‘brain-like command centers’ at their root tips,” Taiz told Live Science in an email. This perspective makes sense if you simplify the workings of a complex brain, reducing it to an array of electrical pulses; cells in plants also communicate through electrical signals, according to the article. However, the signaling in a plant is only superficially similar to the billions of synapses firing in a complex animal brain, which is more than “a mass of cells that communicate by electricity,” Taiz said. “For consciousness to evolve, a brain with a threshold level of complexity and capacity is required,” he added. Other researchers who recently investigated the neuroscience of consciousness — awareness of one’s world and a sense of self — found that in animals, only vertebrates, arthropods and cephalopods had brains complex enough to enable them to be conscious. “If the lower animals — which have nervous systems — lack consciousness, the chances that plants without nervous systems have consciousness are effectively nil,” Taiz said. And what’s so great about consciousness, anyway? Plants can’t run away from danger, so investing energy in a body system that recognizes a threat and can feel pain would be a very poor evolutionary strategy, according to the article. “Being conscious may seem like harmless fun for plants being cared for in a garden, but imagine, for example, the plight of trees during a forest fire. I would not wish to inflict on trees the consciousness and pain of being burned alive,” Taiz said in the email. “Being unconscious is in all likelihood an advantage to plants and contributes to their evolutionary fitness,” he added. The findings were published online July 3 in the journal Trends in Plant Science. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndo A tree falls in the woods; but whether or not anyone hears it, the tree has no regrets. Nor does it experience fear, anger, relief or sadness as it topples to the ground. Trees — and all plants, for that matter — feel nothing at all, because consciousness, emotions and cognition are hallmarks of animals alone, scientists recently reported in an opinion article. The idea that plants have some degree of consciousness first took root in the early 2000s; the term “plant neurobiology” was coined around the notion that some aspects of plant behavior could be compared to intelligence in animals. Though plants lack brains, the firing of electrical signals in their stems and leaves nonetheless triggered responses that hinted at consciousness, researchers previously reported. But such an idea is bunk, according to the authors of the new article. Plant biology is complex and fascinating, but it differs so greatly from that of animals that so-called evidence of plants’ intelligence is intriguing but inconclusive, the scientists wrote. [The 5 Smartest Non-Primates on the Planet] AdvertisementPlants Know Their SiblingsPlants use chemical cues to recognize and cooperate with siblings, while spurring competition among rivals.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65905-plants-dont-think-or-feel.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:2701:27Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭 center_img Image Gallery: Carnivorous Plants in Action In Photos: Plants in Danger of Disappearinglast_img read more