Moderate alcohol consumption linked with lower risk of hospitalization

first_img Source:http://www.neuromed.it/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 12 2018While the heavy negative effects of high consumption are confirmed, those who drink in moderation resort less to the hospital than teetotalersA study of the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention of I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed (Pozzilli, Italy), in collaboration with the Department of Nutrition of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (Boston), highlights that people who consume alcohol moderately (one glass of wine a day), in the general framework of Mediterranean diet principles, have a lower risk of being hospitalized compared to heavier drinkers, but also to the teetotallers.The research, published in the scientific journal Addiction, involved 21,000 participants in the Moli-sani epidemiological study, followed for over 6 years. During this period, their drinking habits were related to their number of hospital admissions.Related StoriesRecreational marijuana users tend to drink more alcohol, medicinal users drink lessExcess grey matter in the brain can predict escalating drinking behavior in teensPeople use executive control processes to ignore cues that signal something rewarding”We observed – says Simona Costanzo, first author of the paper, who spent a period of research in this field at Harvard University, thanks to a grant from the Veronesi Foundation – that a heavy consumption of alcohol is associated with a higher probability of hospitalization, especially for cancer and alcohol-related diseases. This confirms the harmful effect of excessive alcohol drinking on the health. On the other hand, those who drink in moderation present a lower risk of hospitalization for all causes and for cardiovascular diseases compared to lifetime abstainers and former drinkers “.”The data on hospitalizations – comments Licia Iacoviello, Head of the Laboratory of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology of I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed and professor of Hygiene and Public Health at the University of Insubria in Varese – is very important in relation to the impact of alcohol on public health. Hospital admissions, in fact, represent not only a serious problem for people, but they have also a strong impact on National health systems. Our study confirms how much excess alcohol can weigh on healthcare facilities, underlining the urgent need of managing the problem, but it also confirms and extends our previous observations according to which moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduction in mortality risk, regardless of the type of disease”.”We are absolutely not saying – underlines Ken Mukamal Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School – that any teetotaler should start drinking to improve his/her health. However, this research reaffirms that the effects of alcohol consumption cannot be reduced to a single catchphrase or punchline. This very comprehensive study clearly shows that we need to consider its health effects based upon both dose and disease”.last_img read more

Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible says new policy report

This is according to Dr. Barbara Ribeiro of Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at The University of Manchester, in On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, a new policy report on the role of AI and Robotics in society, being published today.Dr. Ribeiro adds because investment into AI will essentially be paid for by tax-payers in the long-term, policymakers need to make sure that the benefits of such technologies are fairly distributed throughout society.She says: “Ensuring social justice in AI development is essential. AI technologies rely on big data and the use of algorithms, which influence decision-making in public life and on matters such as social welfare, public safety and urban planning.””In these ‘data-driven’ decision-making processes some social groups may be excluded, either because they lack access to devices necessary to participate or because the selected datasets do not consider the needs, preferences and interests of marginalised and disadvantaged people.”On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution is a comprehensive report written, developed and published by Policy@Manchester with leading experts and academics from across the University. Provided by University of Manchester Play Dr. Barbara Ribeiro, from Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at the University of Manchester, discusses how to carry out and implement such processes in ‘On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ by Policy@Manchester. Credit: Policy@Manchester The publication is designed to help employers, regulators and policymakers understand the potential effects of AI in areas such as industry, healthcare, research and international policy.However, the report doesn’t just focus on AI. It also looks at robotics, explaining the differences and similarities between the two separate areas of research and development (R&D) and the challenges policymakers face with each.Professor Anna Scaife, Co-Director of the University’s Policy@Manchester team, explains: “Although the challenges that companies and policymakers are facing with respect to AI and robotic systems are similar in many ways, these are two entirely separate technologies – something which is often misunderstood, not just by the general public, but policymakers and employers too. This is something that has to be addressed.” Professor Barry Lennox, Professor of Applied Control and Head of the UOM Robotics Group, adds: “The transfer of robotics technology into industry, and in particular the nuclear industry, requires cultural and societal changes as well as technological advances.”It is really important that regulators are aware of what robotic technology is and is not capable of doing today, as well as understanding what the technology might be capable of doing over the next 5 years.”The report also highlights the importance of big data and AI in healthcare, for example in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR).Lord Jim O”Neill, Honorary Professor of Economics at The University of Manchester and Chair of the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance explains: “An important example of this is the international effort to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The AMR Review gave 27 specific recommendations covering 10 broad areas, which became known as the “10 Commandments.” Play Dr. Barbara Ribeiro, from the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at the University of Manchester, discusses how organizations can develop more representative AI public policies in ‘On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ by Policy@Manchester. Credit: Policy@Manchester One particular area the report highlights where robotics can have a positive impact is in the world of hazardous working environments, such a nuclear decommissioning and clean-up. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Is the UK’s energy policy fit for purpose? PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen The development of new artificial intelligence (AI) technology is often subject to bias, and the resulting systems can be discriminatory, meaning more should be done by policymakers to ensure its development is democratic and socially responsible. Play Dr. Barbara Ribeiro, from the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research at the University of Manchester, discusses how local governments can ensure AI development incorporates greater social justice in ‘On AI and Robotics: Developing policy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ by Policy@Manchester. Credit: Policy@Manchester “All 10 are necessary, and none are sufficient on their own, but if there is one that I find myself increasingly believing is a permanent game-changer, it is state of the art diagnostics. We need a “Google for doctors’ to reduce the rate of over prescription.”The versatile nature of AI and robotics is leading many experts to predict that the technologies will have a significant impact on a wide variety of fields in the coming years. Policy@Manchester hopes that the On AI and Robotics report will contribute to helping policymakers, industry stakeholders and regulators better understand the range of issues they will face as the technologies play ever greater roles in our everyday lives. Citation: Artificial intelligence needs to be socially responsible says new policy report (2018, May 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-artificial-intelligence-socially-responsible-policy.html Explore further read more

Huawei says US sanctions will cost it billions in revenue

first_imgU.S. suppliers are taking a hit, too. Micron Technologies, Qualcomm, Qorvo and Skyworks Solutions have all listed Huawei as a major customer. Last week, chipmaker Broadcom reduced its 2019 revenue forecast by $2 billion, saying customers are trimming orders because of the trade tensions, including the U.S. curbs on sales to Huawei. Broadcom previously estimated full-year revenue of $24.5 billion. The research firm IHS Markit said Micron and Western Digital will also suffer, as they lose a leading buyer of memory chips and storage devices.Huawei is expected to face challenges finding alternative suppliers for components, though IHS says Micron and Western Digital could eventually be replaced by South Korean and Taiwanese suppliers.More broadly, U.S. businesses are expressing alarm at the Trump administration’s aggressive policies toward China. Hundreds of companies, trade groups and individuals have written the U.S. trade representative to protest the administration’s plan to extend tariffs of up to 25% on the $300 billion worth of Chinese sales to the United States that haven’t already been hit by import taxes. Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, center, speaks at a roundtable at the telecom giant’s headquarters in Shenzhen in southern China on Monday, June 17, 2019. Huawei’s founder has likened his company to a badly damaged plane and says revenues will be $30 billion less than forecast over the next two years. (AP Photo/Dake Kang) Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei speaks at a roundtable at the telecom giant’s headquarters in Shenzhen in southern China on Monday, June 17, 2019. Huawei’s founder has likened his company to a badly damaged plane and says revenues will be $30 billion less than forecast over the next two years. (AP Photo/Dake Kang) © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei speaks at a roundtable at the telecom giant’s headquarters in Shenzhen in southern China on Monday, June 17, 2019. Huawei’s founder has likened his company to a badly damaged plane and says revenues will be $30 billion less than forecast over the next two years. (AP Photo/Dake Kang) Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, left, gets make up on his face before attending a roundtable at the telecom giant’s headquarters in Shenzhen in southern China on Monday, June 17, 2019. Huawei’s founder has likened his company to a badly damaged plane and says revenues will be $30 billion less than forecast over the next two years. (AP Photo/Dake Kang) Huawei’s founder said Monday that the Chinese telecom giant’s revenue will be $30 billion less than forecast over the next two years, as he compared the company to a “badly damaged plane” as a result of U.S. government actions against it. China telecom giant Huawei hints US pressure hurting sales Ren denies that Huawei would share user data with the Chinese government if ordered to do so. He said Monday there are no backdoors in its equipment that anyone could access, and that Huawei is willing to enter into a no backdoor agreement with any nation that wants one.Huawei has brought a lawsuit in the U.S. this March challenging the constitutionality of a national security law which prevents the U.S. government and its contractors from using Huawei equipment. The complaint, filed in Plano, Texas, where Huawei’s American operations are headquartered, alleges that the law singles out Huawei for punishment while denying the company due process.The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Huawei is asking Verizon to pay licensing fees for more than 200 of its patents. While Huawei declined to comment on the matter, company spokesman Joe Kelly said it will hold a briefing later this month on being more aggressive about collecting intellectual property licensing fees.Ren said during the panel discussion that Huawei will not use its many patents as a “weapon,” but did not rule out seeking royalties for usage.He emphasized that Huawei will not stop collaborating with other countries and businesses. Explore further Citation: Huawei says US sanctions will cost it billions in revenue (2019, June 17) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-huawei-founder-revenue-billions.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The company’s current situation “is not caused by American businesses, but rather by certain politicians’ different perspectives,” Ren said. “I think both sides will suffer. No one will win.”The panel, organized by Huawei, also included Nicholas Negroponte, the founder of the media lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and writer and investor George Gilder.In December, Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou—Ren’s daughter—was arrested in Vancouver at the request of U.S. authorities. The U.S. alleges that Meng misled American banks about the company’s business dealings with Iran, and that Huawei used a Hong Kong shell company to sell equipment in Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. An extradition hearing is expected to begin in January. Some are showing up in person for seven days of hearings that begin Monday. They want the administration to cancel the tariffs—or at least spare the imports they rely on.Washington claims Huawei poses a national security threat because it is beholden to China’s ruling Communist Party. But American officials have presented no evidence of any Huawei equipment serving as intentional conduits for espionage by Beijing. Huawei’s placement on the Entity List is widely seen as intended to persuade resistant U.S. allies in Europe to exclude Huawei equipment from their next-generation wireless networks, known as 5G. “We never thought that the U.S.’s determination to attack Huawei would be so strong, so firm,” Ren Zhengfei, who is also the CEO, said during a panel discussion at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China.Ren said Huawei will reduce capacity and expects revenue of about $100 billion annually for the next two years, compared with $105 billion in 2018. In February, he said the company was targeting $125 billion in 2019.Huawei’s overseas cellphone sales will drop by 40%, Ren said, confirming a Bloomberg report published Sunday. But the Chinese market is growing rapidly, he said, and Huawei will not allow restrictive measures to curb its research and development.Huawei is embroiled in a trade dispute between China and the U.S., which has accused Chinese companies such as Huawei of committing forced technology transfers and stealing trade secrets. Last month, the U.S. placed Huawei on its “Entity List,” which effectively bars American companies from selling components to Huawei without government approval.last_img read more

ECB to cut rates in September QE 20 still on the cards

first_imgBENGALURU (Reuters) – The European Central Bank will cut its deposit rate in September after signalling a bias to do so this month, according to economists in a Reuters poll who do not expect a turnaround in the euro zone’s economic fortunes any time soon. FILE PHOTO: The logo of the European Central Bank (ECB) is pictured outside its headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany, December 8, 2016. REUTERS/Ralph OrlowskiMajor central banks on both sides of the Atlantic are under pressure to ease monetary policy to keep inflation expectations from collapsing amid slowing global growth, increased trade protectionism and weak economic data. When asked what the ECB was likely to do at its July meeting, two-thirds of economists said the central bank would change its forward guidance towards easing. With inflation well below the central bank’s target and not predicted to pick up soon, the ECB is expected to cut its deposit rate by 10 basis points to an all-time low of -0.50% in September. “We don’t think it will be enough to get inflation back on track towards target. Clearly a 10-basis point move in interest rates doesn’t move the dial really,” said Andrew Kenningham, chief Europe economist at Capital Economics. “But the Governing Council will want to signal that they can do more. This … may have some marginal impact on monetary conditions. But no, I don’t think it will be enough.” Indeed, the July 4-17 Reuters poll of over 100 economists showed the outlook for euro zone growth and inflation — and for most major economies in the region — was at best left unchanged or downgraded compared to previous surveys. At 1.3%, euro zone inflation is lower than where it stood when the central bank stopped its 2.6 trillion euro (£2.3 trillion) asset purchase programme in December. While a majority of economists do not expect the ECB to relaunch asset purchases — known as quantitative easing, or QE — this year, nearly 40% of the respondents expected it to do so, up from about 15% last month. “A rate cut won’t do. While we do think that the ECB will cut rates, we mostly see this as a policy move that will precede the restart of QE,” said Daniele Antonucci, chief euro-area economist at Morgan Stanley. TIME TO PUSH AHEAD The European Commission cut its euro zone growth and inflation outlook last week, citing uncertainty over U.S. trade policy. Quarterly economic growth is set to have slowed to 0.2% last quarter and the consensus points to only a 0.3-0.4% rate of expansion in each quarter through to the end of next year. Inflation, which the ECB targets at just below 2%, is forecast to average 1.3% this year and is not expected to hit the target at any time in the forecast horizon which runs through to 2021. That is likely to give the ECB reason to push ahead with stimulus as hinted at in President Mario Draghi’s speeches over the past month. ECB board member Benoit Coeure said as much in a speech on Wednesday. “Looking ahead, the Governing Council is determined to act in case of adverse contingencies and also stands ready to adjust all of its instruments, as appropriate, to ensure that inflation continues to move towards the Governing Council’s inflation aim in a sustained manner,” Coeure said. The backdrop for the ECB, as for many other global central banks easing policy or considering it, is the U.S.-China trade war and the ructions it has caused. The euro zone is particularly exposed as its economy relies heavily on exports. “I would say the dominant story remains one of trade uncertainty and that will likely dampen the prospects of recovery over the coming six months or so,” said Bert Colijn, a senior economist at ING. All but four of 63 economists who answered a separate question said International Monetary Fund Chief Christine Lagarde, who is due to replace Draghi after he leaves in October, would continue with the current policy stance. “I think she’s not uncomfortable being in this position … because she has been a clear supporter of unconventional policy,” said Frederik Ducrozet, strategist at Pictet Wealth Management. (Analysis and polling by Tushar Goenka and Manjul Paul; Editing by Ross Finley and Catherine Evans)Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

Trumps Labour Secretary Acosta resigns amid Epstein case

first_img“Alex called me this morning and wanted to see me,” Trump told reporters. “I just want to let you know this is him, not me.”Acosta’s resignation is effective in seven days. Trump named Deputy Labour Secretary Patrick Pizzella as the acting secretary of Labour.Acosta has served in Trump’s cabinet since April 2017 and from 2005 through 2009 was the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida. It was there that he handled Epstein’s first case involving sex with girls, which resulted in a punishment that critics say was far too lenient.”Mr. Acosta now joins the sprawling parade of President Trump’s chosen advisors who have left the administration under clouds of scandal and corruption, leaving rudderless and discouraged agencies in their wake. Taxpayers deserve better,” Democratic U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse said in a statement.Epstein, a billionaire hedge fund manager, pleaded not guilty to new federal charges in New York this week. Epstein had a social circle that over the years has included Trump, former President Bill Clinton and Britain’s Prince Andrew.Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic speaker of the House of Representatives, and Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer had called on Tuesday for Acosta to resign.DEFENDING HIS CASEAcosta responded to the criticism on Tuesday with tweets saying Epstein’s crimes were “horrific” and that he was glad prosecutors were moving forward based on new evidence and testimony that could “more fully bring him to justice.”On Wednesday Acosta held a news conference to defend his handling of the deal, which allowed Epstein to plead guilty to a state charge and not face federal prosecution. Acosta said Epstein would have had an even lighter sentence if not for the deal.Acosta would not say if he would make the same decision regarding Epstein now, considering the power of the #MeToo movement that led to the downfall of several powerful men publicly accused of sex crimes by women. U.S. prosecutors in New York on Monday accused Epstein, 66, of sex trafficking, luring dozens of girls, some as young as 14, to his luxury homes and coercing them into sex acts.Democratic U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings, chair of the House Oversight and Reform Committee who has called on Acosta to testify on the Epstein matter, said in a statement: “Secretary Acosta’s role in approving the extremely favourable deal for Jeffrey Epstein raises significant concerns about his failure to respect the rights of the victims, many of whom were children when they were assaulted.”The federal prosecutors in New York said they were not bound by the deal arranged by Acosta, which allowed Epstein to plead to a lesser offence and serve 13 months in jail with leave during the day while registering as a sex offender. In February, a federal judge in West Palm Beach, Florida, ruled that the 2007 agreement violated the victims’ rights. Epstein’s case and Acosta’s role in the plea deal had come under scrutiny earlier this year after an investigation by the Miami Herald.The Epstein case came up during Acosta’s Senate confirmation hearing but the Republican-majority Senate approved him in a 60-38 vote. He is the latest top Trump administration official to depart under a cloud. The heads of the Interior, Justice, State and Health departments have also either been fired or resigned, among other top staff during Trump tenure so far.Acosta, the son of Cuban refugees and the first Hispanic member of Trump’s Cabinet, previously served on the National Labour Relations Board and in the U.S. Department of Justice under Republican President George W. Bush. (Reporting by Nandiat Bose; additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Writing by David Alexander and Jeff Mason; Editing by Bill Trott) Related News WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Labour Secretary Alexander Acosta resigned on Friday amid fresh scrutiny of his handling of the sex abuse case against financier Jeffrey Epstein, becoming President Donald Trump’s latest adviser to leave the administration in controversy.Acosta, joining Trump at the White House before the president left for a trip to Wisconsin, said he did not want to be a distraction to the administration’s work because of his leadership of the Epstein case more than a decade ago.”As I look forward, I do not think it is right and fair for this administration’s Labour Department to have Epstein as a focus rather than the incredible economy we have today,” Acosta said.Trump, who has fired numerous cabinet and other administration officials during his 2 1/2 years in the White House, said it was Acosta’s idea to step down. World 10 Jul 2019 U.S. Labor Secretary Acosta says Epstein crimes ‘horrific’ World 10 Jul 2019 Trump backs U.S. Labor chief Acosta, says will look into matter amid Epstein casecenter_img Related News World 09 Jul 2019 Trump defends cabinet member Acosta embroiled in Epstein sex-abuse case {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more